Tag Archives: Ant Man

Tales to Astonish #48, Oct. 1963

Tales to Astonish #48, Oct. 1963

Story Plot: Stan Lee
Script: H.E. Huntley
Art: Don Heck
Lettering: S. Rosen

Another Tales to Astonish, another retarded trap that almost kills Ant Man. This time, he nearly drowns in a bathtub. Maybe if he was Infant Man, that would work (get it? “ant man” is still in there. I’m too clever for you people, heh heh heh).

Hank and Jan are attending a bank opening (WOO! PARTY!!) when the place is broken into by the Porcupine! A man in a suit covered in bamboo tubes that shoot various things and a gas mask, the Porcupine knocks everyone out with sleeping gas and easily gets away with the money. When Hank recovers, he takes Jan back home so she can recover from her illness (which she apparently caught). Ant Man goes out alone to tackle the Porcupine and gets caught and dumped in a bathtub without his helmet, belt gas canisters, or lasso. The Wasp comes in and saves him, and together they beat– Wait, “lasso”? Since fucking when does Ant Man carry a lasso around with him?

This issue is a really good example of Hank and Janet’s relationship. She constantly expects him to marry her or at least act like they’re married, and he hates her specifically because she is a woman. It’s so cute.

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The Avengers #1, Sept. 1963

The Avengers #1, Sept. 1963

Written by: Stan Lee
Drawn by: Jack Kirby
Inking: Dick Ayers
Lettering: S. Rosen

 

The Avengers started out as a brilliantly simple idea: cram all our guys that don’t have full-length comics into one big team. And it works GREAT. Even if it does have Ant Man in it.

Loki’s up to his normal schemes again. He wants to get Thor’s attention, so he decides to trick the Hulk into destroying some train tracks. This causes Rick Jones’ “Teen Brigade” to send out a signal to the Fantastic Four to stop him, but Loki changes the signal so Thor gets it instead. By accident, the signal is also received by Iron Man and by Ant Man and his partner the Wasp. The four of them show up, and Loki’s annoyed that there are people beside Thor there, and lures him away for a one-on-one fight.

Iron Man and Ant Man go out to find and fight the Hulk, who is pretending to be a super-strong juggling robot in a circus named Mechano. A lengthy, involved fight carries on, until Thor returns from Asgard with Loki stuck to his hammer. He informs everyone that they don’t need to fight each other, and it was only Loki up to his annoying shit again. The heroes (and the Hulk) decide to form a team together, and  call themselves The Avengers, based off of the very first name thrown out, and suggested by the Wasp, no less. Even though they never avenge anything.

This original lineup of the Avengers isn’t very stable, and they don’t really work that well together. Once they dig up Captain America it gets a lot better, and after that once the team becomes made up of minor characters that don’t also have their own titles, it gets really good. Still, nothing’s better than the Hulk in clown makeup juggling horses.


Tales to Astonish #47, Sept. 1963

Tales to Astonish #47, Sept. 1963

Story Plot: Stan Lee
Script: H.E. Huntley
Art: Don Heck

In this issue, we’re introduced to Ant Man’s faithful flying ant, Korr, whom he rides around on (he finally realized shooting himself out of a cannon onto a pile of ants made no sense). Unfortunately, Korr DIES later in the same issue. Well, what the fuck?! Why even introduce the fucker with a name?! Assholes.

The adventure starts with a night on the town, where Jan has somehow convinced Hank to go to a jazz club. Doing anything that Ward Cleaver wouldn’t do is physically painful for Henry Pym, however, and lucky for him there’s a theft afterwards. The thief is the jazz trumpet player they just watched, and as part of his sentence, he goes to India for a while and learns how to hypnotize people with his music.

An indeterminate amount of time later, Trago (the trumpeter) returns and hijacks a TV station so he can mind control everybody. Ant Man and the Wasp are immune to the effect once Ant Man puts his helmet on (uh… wait…), and they fly out to the studio to stop him, stopping only briefly to fight with an iguana. The fight where the brave and gallant Korr the flying ant met his demise. We will never forget you, Korr. Not ever.

We’re finally settled down enough with the Wasp that we can start getting into her and Hank’s relationship, which is, from a modern perspective, entirely horrible. The Wasp is a flighty (HA HA NOT A JOKE) female who’s constantly distracted by shiny things and boys, and Ant Man is a misogynistic asshole who treats her like a child, at the best of times. And yet, they get married. Which is actually the second wedding in the Marvel universe, after Mr. Fantastic makes an Invisible Woman out of Sue Storm. Yes, I know details of relationships in comic books, please fucking shoot me in the face.


Tales to Astonish #46, Aug. 1963

Tales to Astonish #46, Aug. 1963

Plot: Stan Lee
Script: H.E. Huntley
Art: Don Heck
Lettering: S. Rosen

In this issue, Ant Man and the Wasp fight a cyclops, not to be confused with the X-Man Cyclops, who hasn’t actually been invented yet. Instead, it’s more of the classic Greek The Odyssey kind of Cyclops. Except it’s a robot controlled by aliens.

Nothing’s going on in New York (didn’t Ant Man just get back from helping the Fantastic Four fight Dr. Doom?), so Hank Pym and Janet Van Dyne decide to go on a vacation to Greece. For no reason other than for the convenience of the plot. Once they get there, they hear stories about a giant cyclops that steals ships, so they hire a ship and go out to find it. Lo and behold, their captured by a cyclops who brings them to an island where aliens are studying the other sailors their giant cyclops robot has captured. Ant Man gets inside the giant robot’s head and gains control of it, repulsing the aliens and their dreams of conquest.

Man, there must’ve been a hundred kinds of aliens out there in the universe, and every single one of them wants to take over the Earth. What’s so great about the Earth, anyway? Still, it would’ve been kinda funny if these guys had attacked en masse and they had to go up against a real superhero like Thor or something. They’d be little alien paste.


Tales to Astonish #45, July 1963

Tales to Astonish #45, July 1963

Plot: Stan Lee
Script: H.E. Huntley
Art: Don Heck
Lettering: Art Simek

It’s the return of Egghead, Ant Man’s only recurring villain! Unlike everyone else that Ant Man has defeated, the shame of losing to the worst hero in the world didn’t drive Egghead to suicide, I guess.

Instead, Egghead’s become an unshaven bum who sits around in hostels all day mumbling to himself about ants. At least, until one day when two mobsters hide out there and talk about nearly being defeated by Ant Man. This snaps Egghead out of his trance (but he was talking about Ant Man the whole time, wasn’t he? Why would that), and they plan a caper together.

Egghead’s plan is to steal some diamonds, then stash them in a museum exhibit about wasps, under the impression that Ant Man’s new sidekick, the Wasp would doubtless go and find out. The trap works perfectly, and Egghead drops Ant Man down into a tank with an iguana, and after he escapes from that, he sics an anteater on him, because they are the perfect predator for ants. ONLY FOR GETTING ANTS OUT OF NESTS, ASSHOLE!

In the climactic battle, the Wasp grabs a nearby needle and starts stabbing guys in the hand with it, calling it her “wasp’s sting”. Later on, she’d get some wristbands that shot something or other out of them, but in the beginning, she just carries this pin around. And stabs guys with it all over. It’s hilarious.